Angels are … Things we share

The last fine art studio project of the semester, Attention is a task we share, you and I was swiftly overtaken by events.
And the studio briefing itself … it’s unlikely I’ll be doing anything like that again anytime soon … if ever.

During the make Angel project I had an important discussion with one of my colleagues: Did we think that we could ‘do’ one of the projects that we set for the students. Was it possible, given our knowledge of the subject, and how would it feel to work in such a way; would it give us any insight into the difficulties that all students face when trying to engage with the requirements of a particular brief and/or thematic subject … these were some of the things we talked about.
A few days later, in the spirit of shared scholarship, that’s exactly what I did. I started work on make Angel (see my earlier post), and my last studio talk was about how I got on.

I began with Albrecht Dürer and Rory McEwen and Ruskin … wove in poets Poliziano, Rainer Marie Rilke and Edward Thomas, Sami ceremonial drums (cognitive maps; shamanism), A.R. Penck, Robert Walser and finished my talk with a warm and gentle photograph, taken in 1976 by Czesław Siegieda, of three angels waiting … for their call during a rehearsal for a nativity play … waiting … for their futures …

How the world has changed since that final image came up on the screen in studio 3 on Monday the 9th March.

I recently heard Angel (1993) by James MacMillan on BBC Radio 3’s ‘Night Tracks’ (Tuesday May 5th). It was performed by John York.
This lullaby was a gift to his daughter Catherine, and it was composed after a Sikh friend told him that according to his religion angels were present in any household where there were young children. The serene miniature MacMillan created was an attempt to evoke this parallel world of heavenly beings. I recall reading in ‘Silence’ (a collection of John Cage’s lectures) of Cage’s wish to be able to record the sound of mushroom spores falling to the floor of the wood … I hear in Angel by MacMillan the sound of dandelion seeds being carried on the wind and gently touching down in fields and gardens.

What is Sculpture? | To appear … … … radiant?


Alice Aycock, Maze: Aerial view (1972) black and white photograph.

Eight collections of ‘sculptural material’ — artists (a few examples of their work), historical and contemporary PDF documents of artist’s statements, press releases, interviews, web and library references — that may be of interest in relation to this years General Foundation fine art project, What is Sculpture?

1—’Chatter’
Aleks Danko, Wait … I think this is where I lost my hula-hoop (2017)

2—’This was at hand’
A.R. Penck, Standart – Modell (1972-73), Definition of Similarity (1970-71) and Untitled (1966)

3—Late works 1981-85
Ana Mendieta:
http://www.galerielelong.com/exhibitions/ana-mendieta3

4—Living and working in Scotland

Claire Barclay, Fault on the right side (2007)
https://www.clairebarclay.net/


Karla Black, Vanity Matters (2009)
https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/black-vanity-matters-t13282
Kate McLeod (DJCAD Staff), Something Else (2014)
https://sculptors.org.uk/artists/kate-mcleod
Cathy Wilkes, Untitled (2012)
https://www.themoderninstitute.com/artists/cathy-wilkes

5—Jupiter Artland, West Lothian, Scotland.

Phyllida Barlow, Quarry—‘Two towering cement and steel columns and a mountainous flight of ruined stairs.’


Christian Boltanski, Animitas—‘Hundreds of small Japanese bells attached to long stems planted in the ground. The bells chiming to the wind let out the ‘music of souls’ and reproduce the map of the stars on the night Boltanski was born.’


Ian Hamilton Finlay, Only Connect—‘Northumbrian Limestone: arched bridge between two milestones each inscribed with the closing words of ‘Howards End’ by E.M. Forster.’ And, Xth Muse—‘Portland stone head on plinth. Sappho, the tenth muse, is the poetess of erotic lyricism and the symbol of love and beauty.’


Anya Gallaccio, The Light Pours Out Of Me—‘An underground chamber of amethyst surrounded by obsidian in its natural state, protected by gold barbed wire.’

6—A survey
Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women, 1947–2016.
An exhibition by Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, Los Angeles, 2016.
The Artists: Magdalena Abakanowicz, Ruth Asawa, Phyllida Barlow, Lynda Benglis, Karla Black, Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Heidi Bucher, Abigail De Ville, Claire Falkenstein, Gego, Isa Genzken, Sonia Gomes, Francoise Grossen, Eva Hesse, Sheila Hicks, Cristina Iglesias, Rachel Khedoori, Yayoi Kusama, Liz Larner, Anna Maria Maiolina, Marisa Merz, Senga Nengudi, Louise Nevelson, Lygia Pape, Mira Schendel, Lara Schnitger, Shinique Smith, Jessica Stockholder, Michellle Stuart, Kaari Upson, Ursula Von Rydingsvard, Hannah Wilke, Jackie Windsor.

7—Documents
phyllida-barlow-vincent-fecteau.pdf
Francis Alÿs A to Z.pdf
Aleks Danko Wait…I think this is where I lost my hula-hoop_2017-2.pdf
Claes Oldenburg.pdf

8—Frieze Magazine
https://frieze.com/article/natascha-suder-happelmann-will-represent-germany-2019-venice-biennale
https://frieze.com/article/mrinalini-mukherjees-garden-earthly-delights
https://frieze.com/article/olga-jevrics-pioneering-experiments-abstraction-are-shown-london-first-time
https://frieze.com/article/i-want-liberate-full-life-interview-roger-hiorns